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Trinity "Mine Games" Playing Docking Games...

Discussion in 'Trinity Yacht' started by YachtForums, Jul 10, 2009.

  1. NYCAP123

    NYCAP123 Senior Member

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    Would you care to say that again so the captain of Mine Games can hear. He may have missed that "not hard" part.:rolleyes: I haven't seen close-ups but I'd guess you could install a dolphin for the price of the repairs they'll be making.
    For the amounts of money these yachts bring to a town they should "demand" the "space".
  2. NYCAP123

    NYCAP123 Senior Member

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    Culture? Tradition? I'd say it's more a matter of telling the yacht owners to twist rather than laying out a few euros to insure their safety.
  3. K1W1

    K1W1 Senior Member

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    Hi,

    When you consider how many dockings are made annually like this the failure rate is almost non existent among the professionals.

    The weekend warriors however do often provide some excellent dockside viewing and a high carbon emitting alternative to watching the sun go down whilst enjoying evening cocktails.

    August is the peak viewing season for this type of domestic bliss turned nuclear holocaust in the time it takes to dock the boat whilst gesticulating wildly with all mobile body parts :)
  4. Capt Bill11

    Capt Bill11 Senior Member

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    Like I said, everybody has a bad day for what ever reason. :D

    And F-ups like that don't happen very often. So I'd guess there isn't much, if any, real demands being made for pilings.
  5. Hiper

    Hiper New Member

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    I enjoy watching yachts mooring in the Med! The sight of a 150 footer sliding in between 2 other yachts in what seems to be a 5 foot gap is amazing. However, with the amount that some marinas are charging per day, even though seasonal, I can't seem to understand why the cannot come up with a decent solution.

    But as Capt. Bill said, its a demand and space issue. Yachts keep coming back year after year and pay whatever they going rate is with no questions asked. It's either that way, or you end up spending the night out at sea.
  6. AMG

    AMG YF Moderator

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    The short answer is that all slips are used by yachts of different size during the season. Even if you own your slip, it is rented out when you are away, so it must be a flexible system.

    And almost all yachts have twin engines and bow thruster so it is really easy, the trick is when you are not using any thrusters, since they are so noisy...:)
  7. Deckies Feet

    Deckies Feet New Member

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    Mooring a boat can be tricky and everyone has a bad day. There are locations in the Med ‘le Grand Mott’ for example that do have pilings to assist. However it is not the norm. Just because it is done differently in one part of the world does not make it right. I actually find mooring stern too with pilings harder? If pilings were used it would limit berth width and the marinas ability to locate different sized yachts . Many captains moor up without issues, with skill and experience yes. I don’t know if this was the captain of Mind Games first trip to the med or first time docking stern too in a high wind but it looks as if he got slightly flustered. No big deal as it happens to us all at some stage. The questions is should it happen when you’re in commanded of a 150ft, at this stage in the game you should have clocked up some serious experience of pontoon bashing, however at least he or she avoided the Ferretti .
    As for yacht owners demanding the space, berths are very limited in the med, you are lucky to get a berth say in St Tropez, requesting better facilities because of what you pay will fall on amused French ears I think.
  8. Ken Bracewell

    Ken Bracewell Senior Member

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    To be honest, dolphins would really just be another obstacle. A few well placed fenders work better than a few dolphins.
    Whence you get the hang of it, Med-Mooring is really much simpler than pulling into a slip. (As I say this we're preparing to pull into Nantucket stern-to; perhaps I should be knocking on some wood).
  9. NYCAP123

    NYCAP123 Senior Member

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    The slip I've been using this year for the 50 is really for a 40 or 45 with the pilings 30' from the dock. We have about 60' across the marina (bow to bow), a 4kt + current just off the bow and whatever wind. I do it cleanly because that's my job, but my heart rate is up until my quarters are within those pilings. I especially fear the guys next to us who may or may not have experience.
    Sliding 100' down along fenders still leaves rub marks, and get off the straight and narrow and that quarter can dig in.
    Nantucket (and occasionally North Cove, NYC) are the only marinas on the east coast that med moor at all to the best of my knowledge. Everywhere else the big boys lay side to or have pilings. It just seems like the euro marinas aren't putting in an effort to accommodate.
  10. K1W1

    K1W1 Senior Member

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    Hi,

    NYCAP- Can I suggest you put in a season or three in the Med working on a boat before making such comments?
  11. Ken Bracewell

    Ken Bracewell Senior Member

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    Having the weight of a two anchors and chain would do quite a bit to help counteract that wind and current at your slip when backing in. Again, I find that the pilings are just in the way; fenders (two sets if you count the boat you're laying next to) have more give than pilings if you should happen to touch.

    It would seem that the European marinas are being more accommodating than the US since they are squeezing appr. 5 times as many boats into the same amount of frontage. I was one of the first to petition Nantucket to allow Med-Mooring. I've also Med-Moored in Provincetown, Boston, and a couple of places in Maine.


    Perhaps the moderators should move this portion of the discussion to the Thread which relates to Med-Mooring.
  12. NYCAP123

    NYCAP123 Senior Member

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    Too old for that, but thanks. No insult intended in the comment though. It's just that it seems such a logical thing to do, and these boats are spending such serious coin that you'd think the marinas would step up. Sometimes marinas take the attitude that, since they're full the way it is, why should they maybe lose a slip to make things easier for the yachts. I saw that in two marinas I managed and one even when out of there way to inconvenience their customers simply because they could. The actual words used were "---- the customer". It's a concept I just don't understand.
    Coming in on the anchor is necessary in several locations but once the quarters are between pilings things can slow down.
  13. Pascal

    Pascal Senior Member

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    LOL... leave it to a New Yorker to tell the rest of the world how to manage their marinas... sorry, NYCAP, that was too good to pass!

    seriously, i understand that not using pilings allows them more flexibility, what i dont' understand is why dont' they have moorings in place instead of having to rely on anchors, divers, etc... the odds of tangling up, especially with two anchors are huge. I can see how mooring balls coudl end up getting caught in a prop once in a while but still easier. A few years back some of the marinas in St Maarten used moorings.

    that said, i'll confess that it's been a while since i've have to med moor and that was with smaller boats (st Barth), although i did med moor my hatt once, at No Name Harbor here in Miami.

    Considering the skill level of the typical boat driver in the US, it's a blessing that Med Mooring isn't used, insurer adjusters woudl become very busy.

    I think North Cove only med moor the very large boats in the first slip or so. everything else, you just tie alongside the floaters.
  14. NYCAP123

    NYCAP123 Senior Member

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    !
    That's OK Pascal. It's absolutely true. We don't hold back.;)
    Actually, it's mostly just the America's Cup type boats that use it as home port. My hat's off to them. Between the wind and the wakes that funnel in there it's no easy task.
    That skill level isn't limited to Americans. I once worked for a Greek who bought a 46 Azimut as a first boat. Didn't have a clue and couldn't handle the boat so he sold it and bought a 62.:eek: (I've also had French, Canadian, Italian, British, Mid-Eastern, etc. with similar skill levels so PLEASE, nobody get insulted).
  15. AMG

    AMG YF Moderator

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    Many Med ports have mooring lines in place, but not for the big yachts in Monaco, as one day it is a 150´and the next a 300´in the same position.

    But I have never heard anyone complaining about Med moorings in the Med, we are used to it and is doing it all the time, usually without even rubbing the fenders...
  16. Pascal

    Pascal Senior Member

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    my point... the skill levels are different..

    ever watched an 80ish foot charter boat with "professional" crew having trouble anchoring in calm weather? pretty common around here...

    so if they can't anchor with plenty of room, imagine these clowns med mooring...
  17. C4ENG

    C4ENG Senior Member

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    I saw the boat being repaired in Rybovich Oct. 08. They had to remove most of the teak deck and then cut out a large part of the aft deck and stern transom while on the hard to replace. The damage was much more impressive looking while in the yard.

    The Capt was not fired for the incident. From what I heard from others at the time, he did not make up any excuses either for the incident, he simply admitted "Yeah I F***ed up".

    Gotta respect that..
  18. Blair

    Blair New Member

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    I see in Auckland at the Viaduct Basin the marina owners provide their RIBs to assist med mooring vessels and it seems to work OK. Problem of high cross winds is typical. Did observe a RIB deliberately throwing itself between Jim Clark's superyacht and a careering new comer going astern at an angle into the adjacent spot to the effect that the RIB itself became the main fender. The boatman looked somewhat freaked as his beam was compressed alarmingly but it worked! Does suggest that using a RIB as a pusher tug when conditions are dodgy has benefits - is this common?
  19. Yacht News

    Yacht News YF News Editor

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    This is "Athena" you are talking about Blair?
  20. Blair

    Blair New Member

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    Was during the first local America's Cup defence a number of years ago so I am fairly sure it was his previous sailing yacht - name escapes me.