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Re sale value on Water Maker

Discussion in 'Watermakers' started by Rusty Mayes, Jan 18, 2021.

  1. Rusty Mayes

    Rusty Mayes Member

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2019
    Messages:
    56
    Location:
    Sanfransico Bay area
    I am in the process of buying a 2000 Carver 506 with a water maker system installed. The boat was a So-Cal boat and water makers are very popular down there but the boat is now here in Nor Cal and used in primarily fresh or brackish water and we do the majority of our boating Dock Dock as opposed to on the hook or extended time on a mooring ball. Are these systems used to purify fresh or brackish water or only to be used for true seawater desalination?
    The unit is pickled and just taking up space in the ER and mounted to starboard and I believe is contributing to a slight list.
    I am contemplating removal of the system and either storing the system until such time as we sell and include or just sell it as a used system.
    Does anyone have a feeling for what a system might bring on the used market if anything? I can image how buying a used water maker would not be appealing to someone who actually needs one due to the complexity and questions about past service. Not to mention the issue of shipping.
    Rusty Mayes
    Last edited: Jan 18, 2021
  2. DOCKMASTER

    DOCKMASTER Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2012
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    1,115
    Location:
    Ketchikan, Alaska
    Resale really depends on age and condition. Technology has really come a long way on these units. Most newer systems are more automated and also produce more water than older units. Do you know how old yours is? If it is circa 2000 type model, probably not worth much if anything. Also, hard to imagine the system weighs enough to cause a list but perhaps if it is really an old dinosaur unit.
  3. Capt J

    Capt J Senior Member

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    Jul 11, 2005
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    Location:
    Fort Lauderdale
    You can make water from fresh or brackish water as long as the water is clean. Run lower pressure so the output is the same.
  4. Pascal

    Pascal Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 29, 2008
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    7,341
    Location:
    Miami, FL
    Indeed it depends on the unit and its condition. Membranes have limited life, on average 5 to 8 years even pickled so most buyers will assume the membranes need to be replaced.

    if I were to guess, I d say you won’t get more than 15/20% of the cost of an equivalent new unit

    a water maker isn’t going to cause a list.
  5. Rusty Mayes

    Rusty Mayes Member

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2019
    Messages:
    56
    Location:
    Sanfransico Bay area
    Thanks for the replies, I'm looking forward to learning more about the unit and its capability. My engine surveyor just mentioned that it would be of no use to me in the waters we boat in but upon considering the source I'll defer to other resources before I decide whether to use it or not.
  6. d_meister

    d_meister Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2010
    Messages:
    444
    Location:
    San Diego, CA.
    RO elements are manufactured to different purposes. DOW chemical makes the best known RO membranes and has quite a bit of information. Membranes are somewhat self cleaning because of cross-flow. Using a salt water membrane in brackish or fresh water can cause problems with scaling, as the flow is decreased to produce at the membrane's rated capacity. Switching the membrane to one specifically engineered for fresh/brackish would be best. What would make sense about a watermaker in the Sacramento Delta, is the capability of removing:
    • Endotoxins/pyrogens.
    • Insecticides/pesticides.
    • Herbicides.
    • Antibiotics.
    • Nitrates.
    • Sugars.
    • Soluble salts.
    • Metal ions.

    I have to wonder what's in municipal water in many areas of the country. San Diego water is undrinkable from the tap.
    There's a lot to be said for confidence in the water you drink and cook with, not to mention ice for drinks :)
    I've run yachts in Alaska and the Pacific Northwest, and found that having a water maker makes life easier. I've run into water unavailability because of droughts in Western Canada, and there's the issue of the time involved for filling a water tank with a garden hose and blocking the fuel dock. It's better to make water when the gen is running, anyway. Almost free!