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Thoughts on Hatteras 58 LRC

Discussion in 'General Trawler Discussion' started by Boston whaler, Aug 29, 2018.

  1. Boston whaler

    Boston whaler New Member

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    I have been looking at some Hatteras 58 LRC's and really like the layout and feel of the boat. Does anyone have any experience with late 70s vintage of these boats? How do they handle in head and following seas, any quirks they are known to have? Any input would be appreciated.
  2. kevin8tor

    kevin8tor New Member

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    There is a couple out of Philadelphia that have a 58 Hatt (not sure if it's a LRC). They have a pretty good youtube channel called Trying Not to Sink. For someone that is considering coastal cruising in this vintage boat, they provide a great deal of information about the ICW, good marinas, towns to visit, cost of ownership, maintenance, and of course their specific boat. I think you might find it useful to check out.
  3. Capt J

    Capt J Senior Member

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    Hatteras of that era have always been known as an amazing head sea boat. Following seas they have always been known to be a very good boat as well. Beam seas they've always been known to rock and roll a bit. I've never run a 58' LRC, but I've run 100's of Hatteras' in that 1970's-1990's vintage.
  4. PacBlue

    PacBlue Senior Member

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    The 58LRC is a round bilged displacement hull, far different than the other Hatt's of that era.

    https://www.yachtworld.com/boats/19...6/Daytona-Beach/FL/United-States#.W4cHlHmWx9A

    A lot of boat for that size, maybe a lot of windage for the draft, a nice looking boat with a friendly layout except for the tiny showers. I personally would not want to be limited by the trawler speeds and opt for the faster option, their 58 MY:

    https://www.yachtworld.com/boats/19...ittle-River/SC/United-States?refSource=browse listing#.W4cIGXmWx9A
  5. cleanslate

    cleanslate Senior Member

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    My dream boat! Love the 58LRC. This is only my dock side perspective though... There is a couple that comes into my marina in Cape May every year while traveling north, boat is called "Knucklehead" he was a bigwig at Harley-Davidson and the creator of that engine for them....Anyway that boat is in super Bristol condition and is set up for some serious safe comfortable cruising . I would love to own this boat. I believe they had a H-D dealership in Fla. too.
  6. JWY

    JWY Senior Member

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    Disclosure: I am a broker with a 58lrc currently listed for sale.

    For the rest of the story: I have sold several of the Hatteras 58 & 65 lrcs, so my opinions are based on past experience. These boats have the most liveaboard space of any in their size range. Great separation of Master from Guest, great engine room, and humongous live-aboard volume. Good seakeeping and seahandling although active fin stabilizers are a must.

    BUT: these are old boats. A proven classic with good bones, but they are old boats. If someone is a Hatteras lrc fan, then great, there are a few choices with each yacht having its own particular pros and cons. But if you are looking for a Hatteras in the general price range of the lrcs, then you can find something newer and in better condition. But for a Hatteras lrc fan, there's nothing comparable proven by most owners keeping them far longer than average yacht ownership.

    Judy
  7. Prospective

    Prospective Senior Member

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    I love this boat as well. My observations are strictly from dock side but I've admired the lines on these boats and the price tag while I harbor fantasies of long distance passagemaking and extended live aboard cruising. My two hangups with this boat are 1) Age, they are all old and unless someone before you bit the bullet to update them it's a big job. The old Detroits would scare me and then there's the older electrical, plumbing, etc. and 2) my other hangup with this boat is the pilot house. It is small with a bench seat and know helm chair in versions I've seen. I would much prefer a proper pilot house with two helm chairs, better seating for guests, and perhaps a pilot berth.
  8. Capt Ralph

    Capt Ralph Senior Member

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    I'm confused why the Detroit's would scare you? Do you realize how many boats and yachts are still dependably powered by the most reliable design ever?
    These ole beast will out live 3 generations and still be serviceable. End of life is scheduled for the B52 is some time in 2040. Detroit's WILL LIVE FOREVER.
    I have toured a 58LRC. Fell in luv with it within 10 minutes. Twin 6-71 Ns with 6000 hours that I could not fear.
    Just wish I was not more in luv with my 58 Bert with twin 12V71TIs that we have lived on for 15 years now or I would be on that 58LRC

    These Y F threads are full of Detroit fans. And like the rivals of Red Sox vs Blue Jays, we carry on between 53s, 71s and 92s. Sometimes a 149 fan chimes in.
    BUT we all agree, they sling oil but will out live us and we still luv them.

    So, what are you scared of, A REAL Motor?
  9. Capt Ralph

    Capt Ralph Senior Member

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    BTW
    Our spring chickens just turned 40 last June. I know we can take them ANYWHERE in the morning at any speed desired.
    Have fuel will travel.

    Cue Johnny Western them song..
  10. cleanslate

    cleanslate Senior Member

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    Do not fear old boats! I'm the king of old boats....I'm 49 grew up on my Parents 1937 50' Matthews in the 1970's then 1971 55' Pacemaker in the 1980's. Then my own 1976 Chris Craft 23' Lancer. Then from 2000 -2011 42' 1962 Matthews....I currently own 1981 Ocean Yachts and a 1974 Chris Craft dory . We/I both used and enjoyed them all. They all were good quality builders from the start, just like Hatteras which is even more so except Matthews ..LOL, so you want to start out with an old boat builder that has a good reputation along with good care from previous owners. I really don't care or worry about the, current at that time, electrical systems, plumbing, engines, etc...if the boat looks clean everywhere, it floats, you really sea trail it with a surveyor, and all systems function , you are good to go.Something is always going to happen with boats...both new and old, Right? You can update over time as you use the boat. My Ocean still has the same wiring , breakers and panel and plumbing...it's all in good shape. Another key is you buy the boat at the right price.

    Now the Pace had DD 871n's and ran for ever along with easy to get parts. The 42' Matthews had original 1962 GM diesels, before the were called DD, 6v53n series...both were majored by a previous owner. They ran super and never were smoky even at a cold start. Just hit that start button and the lit right up. Also parts were easy to get.
    The Ocean has DD 471ti's they ran ok but in three years I have had to replace some parts like turbo, exhaust elbow , governors , some injectors...mostly due to lack of use. But parts were easy to get and not to expensive.

    What Capt Ralph said from his comfy old better than new Bertram, DD's are the best when it comes to old boats...lots of parts around along with mechanics that know how to work on them...there is a good one in every port, ya just got to network and find them...
    I love the old boats ! They look like a boat, they smell like a boat and operate/handle like a boat!

    Now go out and get that clean ,well maintained 58'LRC with DD 71 series naturals! You'll figure out that pilot house while you run it!
  11. chesapeake46

    chesapeake46 Senior Member

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    Amen.
  12. Capt Ralph

    Capt Ralph Senior Member

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    Looks, Smells & operates like a boat, then it must bee,,,
    (Quack Quack??) A good ole boat..

    Sorry, The devil made me type that..
  13. Boston whaler

    Boston whaler New Member

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    Thanks all for the great input. Glad to hear DD parts and mechanics not a big issue as that was a concern. As I started out a rag merchant, 9 Knots is a lot faster than I used to go unless I was surfing down one heck of a following sea!
    Thanks for the heads up on the showers - hadn't checked that out and they are a bit snug, but the rest of the space, especially the engine room, makes up for it. Didn't hear any major cautions other than to have a thick maintenance wallet.
  14. Lenny

    Lenny Member

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    Old boats- some thoughts. I am the owner of a 78' Jongert Motor Yacht - 1987, "Grand Cru". We are sitting in Naples, Italy. We are just two weeks away from completing our cruise of the Med started in May 2018. The boat has crossed the Atlantic 7 times, previous owner. We shipped on Dockwise only because our third major refit was running late and wanted to give the crew a few weeks off. Easily could have crossed
    Anyway started in Palma. Did all three Balearic Islands, around them all. Crossed over to Barcelona. Up the coast and crossed to Marseille. Along the French Coast to Monaco. Monaco crossed to Corsica. All around Corsica and Sardinia and crossed to Naples. We will do the Amalfi Coast and then home in three weeks. Over 50 stops and anchorages. We only lost one day due to an oil leak in our crash pump. Also a few days due to two Mistrals( Almost hurricanes). NO OTHER PROBLEMS from a 40 year old boat.
    Bottom lime - Old boat- Spent way too much money on three major refits BUT this is a battleship. We go when everyone else is sitting in port. Per our Naval Architect " Almost impossible to build a boat like "Grand Cru", just too expensive." We do 10 knots. Plenty fast enough. Also we filled the fuel tanks n Ft Lauderdale and have bought almost no fuel. So buy a 58LRC, spend some money on refits, and you will have a great boat that will last longer than you.
    There is a LRC club with great owners that will be very helpful.
  15. Oscarvan

    Oscarvan Senior Member

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    As a kid growing up in Holland the Jongerts were always drool city at the annual boat show...... Fantastic craftsmanship in design and execution......
  16. Lenny

    Lenny Member

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    Thanks Oscarvan for the kind comment on my Jongert. As a side note, I see you are in Bethlehem PA. I spent 4 years of my life in Bethlehem at Lehigh University, obtaining my engineering degree. Long time ago.
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 4, 2018
  17. Capt Ralph

    Capt Ralph Senior Member

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    You need to find a good old local DD shop.
    If they make reference to some old DD tech, that's the shop you may consider to support you.
    Lots of folks think they can work on DDs, keep throwing parts at it and something will get fixed.
    That old tech with some missing teeth (maybe a finger), can usually lay his hands, find the bug, beat it with a hammer and fix it first time.
    That old fart will save you lots of time and money.

    Unless he has a son or two following him, when he passes, a real DD tech is lost forever.
    This may be the down side of DDs.
    New techs wear lab coats and plug computers in to newer engines.
    They never get that feel or ear for the engines their working on.
    Never smile and stare at a well running motor.

    ALWAYS get genuine DD parts.
    Lots of after market stuff out there you don't want to gamble on.

    71s Rule
  18. Prospective

    Prospective Senior Member

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    I will humbly defer to your expertise on DD motors. And I will freely admit I have no first hand experience with them. I will also freely admit that the horror stories I've heard relate to the high horsepower motors put in many sportfish over the years. Like a lot of things in life, familiarity increases comfort level. You are very familiar with them and and very comfortable with them. I thought I provided some other feedback on the LRC as well. Sorry this is what made the headlines. Carry on...
  19. Capt Ralph

    Capt Ralph Senior Member

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    Corrected text.
  20. Capt J

    Capt J Senior Member

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    All of the 2 stroke detroits were crude by todays standard, leaking oil, smoke on startup, etc., but the **** things always started up and ran provided you had fuel to them. The 71 series are good motors and the N version is pretty much indestructible. The 92' series where everyone crammed a ton of fuel and boost into them, lead to a short live lifespan on them. There were some exceptions. I took care of a 1987 63' Ocean SF with 12v92 TI's, I think they were J+T's. It went over 6,000 hours on the original engines, overpropped, and mostly towing a big heavy 35' marlago around.

    I know of an Arneson boat that I used to take care of with 8v92 ddec's that is underpowered. Boat has to do over 26 knots full of fuel to stay on plane and 26.5 knots, and with 1/2 fuel had to run them 90% load and 27-30 knots...… if you backed off of 90% it would slowly fall off of plane.....motors had to be rebuilt at 960 hours...… they now have another 900 and the current owner put the never/better 6 nozzle injectors, bigger huie pump, and had the computers chipped and the 760 HP motors are putting out supposedly 1000 HP now...….boat gets up and runs 44 knots WOT and owner cruises it at 38 knots 80% and supposedly everything is staying together...…...probably better for them, even though really high HP, they're not running the huge load factors to stay on plane that they were. I know of another older 52' Hatteras on the West coast, guy did the pump and injectors and it's been running great for 600 hours so far and he picked up almost 6 knots at cruise.
    Tuna-Tic likes this.