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The Love of Classic Yachts (or knot)...

Discussion in 'General Yachting Discussion' started by olderboater, Oct 25, 2017.

  1. olderboater

    olderboater Senior Member

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    How about a picture of your newest boat too?
  2. AMG

    AMG YF Moderator

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    Not that new any longer, but here they are, the newest and the oldest together...

    IMG_4373.jpg IMG_4371.jpg
  3. chesapeake46

    chesapeake46 Senior Member

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    The woody gets my vote.
  4. AMG

    AMG YF Moderator

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    Mine too...

    Furuvik Sunset.jpg
  5. olderboater

    olderboater Senior Member

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    Can I choose between the woodie and a Delta 54?
  6. AMG

    AMG YF Moderator

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    Perhaps you rather take the Delta 60 Open then..?

    D60.jpg
  7. olderboater

    olderboater Senior Member

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    I'd take the 60 and one day it might even be a classic even though some here say today's boats have no style.

    I see you valuing your older wood boat and it's beautiful. However, one can say that and still love the newer boats.
  8. AMG

    AMG YF Moderator

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    Yes, and inside the D60 is almost a woodie...

    D60 Owners.jpg
  9. Capt J

    Capt J Senior Member

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    Ahhhh, did a custom sportfish builder make that from a leftover deck and covering boards of a SF??????

    heheheheehhehehe JUST KIDDING. It is beautiful, but just looking at it makes me think of all of the work to keep the varnish up.
  10. AMG

    AMG YF Moderator

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    This is of course the main difference to other materials and we usually cover the decks to protect for the sun and the Seagulls...

    (The sail boat is the Royal Huisman built Juliet)

    1931 Deck covers.jpg
  11. rcrapps

    rcrapps Senior Member

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    One from me.
  12. saltysenior

    saltysenior Senior Member

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    one thing not mentioned. to really appreciate and admire an old classic is to understand the methods and tools used in those days....hardly any power tools, no composites, spray guns, laminates, lasers, computerized plans, etc. ....used lousy sandpaper, slotted brass screws, paint and varnish brushes and very little choices of glue, paint additives, tools and preservatives , yet the workmanship was on a par with today's.
  13. YachtForums

    YachtForums Publisher/Admin

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    No truer words ever posted to YF! Labor is apparently frowned upon in this day & age. Ask any millennial! ;)
  14. Fishtigua

    Fishtigua Senior Member

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    Happily some of the old ways have been passed onto newer skilled hands. My late stepfather helped this to happen in the UK and Caribbean.

    http://www.yachtingmonthly.com/news...-training-pioneer-david-w-simmonds-dies-30399
  15. 30West

    30West Member

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    I watched the grandsons and great-grandson of Chris Smith (Chris Craft) building boats at Grand Craft decades ago. As an engineer, my mind was blown. They would bend a piece of thin wood along the ribs, pick out a piece of wood, and craft that piece into two planks (one for each side with matching grain) that fit so perfectly, you could not get your fingernail into the seams with the adjacent planks. This was done with a shaper table and hand tools, multiple compound curves, simply breathtaking to watch. They didn't do a lot of measuring, mostly by eye. Grandson Chris is still designing and building wood boats with his sons, in his workshop, which houses an incredible amount of antique boat artifacts and memorabilia.

    My best friend growing up is one of the best varnish men in the world, people fly him in to touch up their priceless babies when they get a scratch. His shop is an endless parade of mahogany and chrome porn, in restorations or repairs or new builds.

    http://woodenrunabout.com/
  16. olderboater

    olderboater Senior Member

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    There's still some incredible workmanship. Just because the materials are different on some of it, doesn't mean there isn't skill. The work with steel, aluminum and fiberglass by some is remarkable. Then the interior carpentry is amazing.
  17. Capt J

    Capt J Senior Member

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    Wood too. Some of the interior craftsmanship is still amazing. Merritt's have amazing woodwork. So do a lot of the other customs like Bayliss, Jim Smith, etc.

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