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Taking a musical instrument?

Discussion in 'Yacht Crews' started by smuggers, Dec 30, 2017.

  1. smuggers

    smuggers New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2017
    Messages:
    1
    Location:
    Wales
    Hi guys,

    Looking at getting into the industry and I have one of those silly questions.

    Is it feasible to want to work on a boat the will allow me to take an electric guitar, electric as i never intend to plug it in so it will be quiet. Is it likely that i'll find a boat with room for me to store in on? It'll just be a cheap one that i'm not to worried about getting damaged.

    I'm not much of a reader or watcher of movies but love to play around on my guitar.

    Thanks,
  2. Ken Bracewell

    Ken Bracewell Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2006
    Messages:
    1,207
    Location:
    Somewhere Sunny
    That's totally feasible. My Bosun carries three guitars, although we have much more cabin space than the average crew. You might also look into a backpackers guitar. Or a ukulele
  3. ranger42c

    ranger42c Member

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2013
    Messages:
    295
    Location:
    South River, Chesapeake Bay
    At one time, Fender made a "Mini Twin" battery-powered amp that fits pretty much in the palm of your hand, easily sufficient for monitoring yourself in a small space like many crew quarters. Marshall makes (or made) a similar unit called a "Mini Stack" I think.

    Or... Yamaha now makes a bodiless (?) Silent Guitar (SLG) in both nylon- and steel-stringed versions, meant to be heard through headphones... or through an amp. There's no back or front to it, only the frame sides and neck, and the upper bout comes off for transport in a gig bag without the big soundbox shape. Fairly light weight. I played one recently, a nylon-strung version, and it was quite nice.

    Martin's backpacker acoustic guitars are popular with some, although I found it difficult to hold onto one because of the form (or mostly, lack thereof). OTOH, there are also several 3/4 size quitars available, Yahama's is an APXT2 (I think), Taylor's is their GS Mini, Martin makes one, etc. These didn't fit me well, but might be right for you.

    Another option you might want to consider, given freedom to choose, could be a "thinline" parlor acoustic-electric guitar as by Yamaha (APX500III), Ibanez AEGxxII (where xx is the tonewood), Epiphone PR-5E, and others. This is simply a relatively small parlor guitar with less depth in the soundbox. This size might be pushing your storage limits, but I just got a PRS SE A15AL model, possibly the "fattest" version of the several "thinlines" available to see how it works for us onboard. (If it turns out to take up too much space, I might punt and revert to the SLG idea... or try one of my small/thin hollow-body electrics.)

    A baritone ukulele is tuned like the top four of a guitar, if you didn't know that and if that might make the uke option more palatable.

    In most cases, a gig bag might be slightly better than a real case... not for actual protection, but rather for the storage situation. With a real case, once the guitar is out of it... now you have TWO things taking up pretty much that same amount of space.

    -Chris
  4. rcrapps

    rcrapps Senior Member

    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2004
    Messages:
    5,063
    Location:
    Jax FL
    OTOH
    It takes a crew that agrees with any instrument on board.
    You may get vetoed down to a walk-man and an air-guitar.

    My wife plays and when she figures out an other song, it drives me nuts.

    Close space, new friends around you; When I was crew, your fingers would of been smashed the first 5 minutes playing the same frame the 3rd time.

    I tell ya, it's your co workers that will decide if you play anything, Especially when your the next NFG.
  5. ranger42c

    ranger42c Member

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2013
    Messages:
    295
    Location:
    South River, Chesapeake Bay
    Yes, fair points. I have more freedom to choose (mandate, if necessary) than would new staff on a boat with larger crew...

    Could be more "quiet space" options available on a larger boat, though...

    Competence can probably influence the outcome, too. Di Meola- or Clapton-quality might be received more graciously than Joe Wannabbee who just started playing day before yesterday.

    -Chris

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